2 Months

Tips, Tricks & Resources

What to Expect

Your baby is already learning and growing! Expect your child to begin smiling at people, notice sounds, pay attention to faces, and sleep a lot – up to 18 hours per day! If you need more support, the City’s Newborn Home Visiting Program is available to help with the adjustment to parenthood. Scroll down to find out more!

Events

Babies & Books

Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Enjoy songs, fingerplays, stories and more while meeting other babies and caregivers in the neighborhood! Ages 0-18 months.

Family Storytime

Time: 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Little ones from 0-5 years old and their parents/caregivers can enjoy great stories, lively songs, fun rhymes, and meet other little ones in the neighborhood.

Baby Playtime! – Woodside Library

Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Come join us for an hour of free play and "meet your neighbors! For babies up to age one and their caregivers.

Programs

Home visits for new moms

Newborn Home Visiting Program (NHVP)

NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene

New moms can get home visits from health professional to help with breastfeeding, health and safety tips and connections to community resources.

Milestones

How your child plays, learns, speaks, and acts offers important clues about their development.

What most 2 month olds do at this age:

  • Social

    • Begin to smile at people
    • Can briefly calm themselves
    • Try to look at parent
  • Communication

    • Notice sounds
    • Coo, make gurgling sounds
  • Learning

    • Pay attention to faces
    • Begin to follow things with eyes and recognize people at a distance
    • Begin to act bored if activity does not change
  • Physical Development

    • Can hold head up and begin to push up when lying on stomach
    • Make smoother movements with arms and legs
  • Health

    • Receive needed nutrition from breast milk or formula
    • Feed eight to 12 times per day
    • Steadily gain weight
    • Sleep up to 18 hours per day
    • Are on schedule with shots

Act early by talking to a doctor, teacher, or social worker if your child:

    • Doesn’t respond to loud sounds
    • Doesn’t watch things as they move
    • Doesn’t smile at people
    • Doesn’t bring hands to mouth
    • Can’t hold head up when pushing up when on tummy